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Urban Forest Master Plan (UFMP)

 

2016 Street Tree Planting

The spring planting season will soon be starting. In neighbourhoods throughout the City there will be an additional 1500 trees planted in June to beautify and expand our urban forest.

Since the UFMP was approved by Regional Council in 2012, 4,600 new street trees have been planted throughout our City. Nineteen tree species have been selected for spring and summer planting and seven tree species have been chosen for fall planting. In years to come these trees will beautify our neighbourhoods and grow to form a protective canopy cover.

Click on the following areas to learn more about where new street trees will be planted this spring:

Fairview/ Lower Sackville, Dartmouth, Eastern Passage, Colby Village, Halifax Peninsula

 

2015 Street Tree Planting

Since the UFMP was approved by Regional Council in 2012, more than 4,200 new street trees have been planted throughout our City.

HRM’s urban forest consists of all trees within the urban core, including street trees, park trees, and trees on private and public land. The goal of the plan is to ensure a sustainable future for our urban forest and to create awareness about the many benefits we all gain from the trees in our neighbourhoods.   This spring and summer, 1300 new street trees were planted with an additional 400 street trees scheduled to be planted this fall. Thirteen tree species were selected for spring and summer planting and seven tree species have been chosen for fall planting. In years to come these trees will beautify our neighbourhoods and grow to form a protective canopy cover.

The progress of the UFMP street tree planting project is being monitored by faculty and students from Dalhousie University’s School for Resource and Environmental Studies (SRES). Monitoring crews spent this summer visiting neighbourhoods to evaluate the condition of our new street trees and to identify any diseased or dead trees to be removed and replaced under the full replacement warranty provided by our tree planting contractors. During October and November, 175 replacement trees will be planted. In the meantime, please remember you can report street tree damage to our Citizen Call Centre at: 311.

Click on the following areas to learn more about where new street trees will be planted this fall:

Armcrest, Colby Village, Connaught/Quinpool, Fairview, Heritage Hills,and North End Halifax,

 

Winter 2014/15 - Cyclical Street Tree Pruning

The Halifax UFMP focusses on the need for improved tree maintenance through more regular tree pruning and general tree care efforts. Many cities in North America with urban forest management plans have adopted a 7-year pruning cycle. This is an adaptive approach which aims to resolve structural issues encountered during normal tree growth. It is a general guideline for each street tree as not all seasonal, species-based growth rates, or incidental damage can be foreseen. Overall, pruning can significantly increase the lifespan of a street tree and its environmental benefits while reducing costs associated with its eventual removal and replacement.The first annual UFMP cyclical pruning project took place between January and March, 2014. Hundreds of trees along 10 kilometres of city streets were trimmed.

The second annual UFMP winter street tree pruning project will start on Monday, December 8, 2014 on Connaught Avenue between Chebucto Road and Bayers Road.

Four work areas have been identified for phase one of the pruning project.

Weekly public service announcements will be issued to notify drivers and local residents of pruning work taking place in the work areas. Temporary lane closures may be required and street parking may be briefly prohibited to ensure public safety while pruning work is underway.

Halifax media releases are available at: http://www.halifax.ca/mediaroom/pressrelease/releases.php

 

Urban Orchard Pilot Project

The Halifax region is getting its first urban orchard at the Dartmouth Commons! The municipality has partnered with Halifax Diverse and Dartmouth Common Community Garden members to develop a plan and implement an urban orchard pilot project.

 

Urban Orchard Pic

 

In 2013, Mayor Mike Savage met with more than 80 stakeholders working to address public and community health issues as part of the Mayor's Conversation on a Healthy and Liveable Community. Those discussions identified local food production as a priority for Halifax’s municipal government in 2014/15. Similar concerns were expressed by the public in 2012 during development of Halifax’s Urban Forest Master Plan (UFMP).

Establishing an urban orchard pilot project was seen as a short-term, achievable goal that would contribute to progress in food security and local food consumption. As such, Regional Council passed a motion in January to develop and implement the pilot through the Healthy Communities Core Priority Areas plan.

For more information on urban orchards and this intitiative, check out the Halifax's Urban Orchard Project Discussion Paper or the Results of the Consultation Workshop from June 2014.

 

Urban Forest Master Plan Takes Root: 2014 Spring Street Tree Planting

Five urban forest neighbourhoods have been selected to take part in a pilot program to significantly increase the number of street trees in Halifax.  Each neighbourhood will have about 300 trees planted each year for the next five years. Click on the following areas to see where new trees were planted last year and where more trees will be planted this spring:

Colby Village, Connaught/Quinpool, Eastern PassageFairview and North End Halifax

The pilot program will include improved tree care and maintenance programs. A variety of hardy native tree species will be selected.  In years to come these trees will beautify their urban forest neighbourhoods and grow tall to form a protective canopy cover. 

 

Winter 2014 - Cyclical Street Tree Pruning Trial - Phase 1

Phase one of the cyclical street tree pruning trial will commence on January 14, 2014 and will continue throughout the winter months. During this time streets (shown below in red) will be temporarily closed while pruning takes place.

Cyclical Street Tree Pruning Trial- Phase 1

Four work areas have been identified for phase one of the pruning trial.

Weekly public service announcements will be issued to notify drivers and local residents of pruning work taking place in the work areas. Temporary road closures may be required and street parking may be briefly prohibited to ensure public safety while pruning work is underway.

 

2013 Street Tree Planting

Five urban forest neighbourhoods have been selected to take part in a pilot program to significantly increase the number of street trees in HRM.  Each neighbourhood will have about 300 trees planted each year for the next five years. Click on the following areas to see where new trees were planted.

Colby Village, Connaught/Quinpool, Eastern PassageFairview and North End Halifax

The pilot program will include improved tree care and maintenance programs. A variety of hardy native tree species will be selected.  In years to come these trees will beautify their urban forest neighbourhoods and grow tall to form a protective canopy cover. 

 

UFMP Milestones

 

Urban Forest Master Plan Approved by Regional Council

On Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012, Halifax Regional Council approved in principle HRM's urban forest master plan. The UFMP was developed in cooperation with Dalhousie University’s School for Resource and Environmental Studies (SRES) after many years of research, public engagement, workshops and reports.  A research team under the leadership of Dr. Peter Duinker conducted studies on issues ranging from UFMP best practices to the potential impacts of climate change effects on urban forests. HRM and Dalhousie staff contributed to the extensive forest inventory, mapping and writing efforts required in the creation of the UFMP.

The overall goal of the UFMP is to ensure a sustainable future for our urban forest. The multiyear community engagement process and research initiatives that led to the development of the Plan resulted in an integrated social, ecological, and economic strategy that strives to incorporate the values of HRM citizens.

Two editions of the Plan are available for download (see below). The first edition was produced for public review prior to Regional Council's adoption of the Plan. It was intended as a working copy to be followed by a more polished second edition. The new UFMP document features an improved layout with many new maps, illustrations and images. The second edition has been optimized for fast web viewing and is also fully hyperlinked to enable the reader to easily navigate throughout the Plan. The files should be downloaded to obtain the best navigation results. Keyboard commands for returning to a previous view (Alt.+Left Arrow). To navigate to a new view (Alt.+Right Arrow).

A UFMP digest is also available for download. It's a condensed version of the UFMP designed for easy reading.

1st Edition HRM Urban Forest Master Plan - Adopted September 25, 2012 (PDF 12 MB)
2nd Edition HRM Urban Forest Master Plan- July, 2013 (PDF 51 MB)
UFMP Digest HRM UFMP Digest (PDF 10 MB)

 

UFMP Primer

What is an urban forest?

Our urban forest includes all trees - from a single maple in a planter, to a row of elms lining a downtown street, to carefully tended pines in residential backyards, to islands of native forest amidst urban development. Their natural diversity and their interconnectedness with human activities and the built environment make urban forests both complex and dynamic.

Where is our urban forest?

The urban forest extends approximately 15 km outwards from the Halifax Harbour and is geographically defined by HRM communities that receive water and wastewater services.

Urban Forest Communities

Communities receiving these services generally feature the types of compact development and nearby urban centre amenities usually associated with urban living. HRM’s urban forest can be seen as a seamless natural resource that spans all public and private properties in the serviced communities of Bedford, Beechville, Lakeside, Timberlea, Cole Harbour, Dartmouth, Eastern Passage, Halifax Mainland, Halifax Peninsula, Sackville, and Spryfield.

Visit our FAQ page to learn more about urban forests.

The UFMP Planning Team  

HRM staff from Real Property Planning and Transportation and Public Works are working with a team from Dalhousie University’s School for Resource and Environmental Studies (SRES) to develop the Urban Forest Master Plan.  The Dalhousie research team is led by Dr. Peter Duinker, Director of SRES, and includes his graduate research students

Dalhousie University Banner

Your questions, comments and corrections are welcome. Please e-mail us at: ufmp@halifax.ca

tree-clipart-4.jpgBenefits of Trees