Robie Street/Young Street Transit Priority Corridor

Construction on new dedicated bus lanes is now complete on Robie Street (between Quinpool Road and Young Street) and Young Street (between Robie and Windsor streets). This project is a key component of the Integrated Mobility Plan (2017), which recommended investment in transit lanes on several key corridors to give priority to buses over general traffic, improve transit reliability, and ultimately encourage more people to use transit. Phase 1 of the Robie Street / Young Street Transit Priority Corridor is now complete.

Learn more about bus lanes on these streets, and how it will change how you use them.

What has Changed?

Bus lanes have been added to sections of Robie Street and Young Street.

Robie Street:

  • Quinpool Road to Cunard Street: both directions
  • Cunard Street to Almon Street: northbound (outbound) only
  • Almon Street to Young Street (both directions)

The Robie Street bus lane will be available for the exclusive use of transit vehicles Monday to Friday from 6 a.m.-6 p.m. Outside of these times, some locations will allow for parking and/or loading.

Young Street:

  • Robie Street to Windsor Street: westbound (outbound) only

How Do the Bus Lanes Work?

The curb lanes on Robie Street and Young Street are dedicated primarily for the use of buses. Other vehicles are not permitted to drive or park in the bus lane during the times when the bus lane is in effect.

Why Transit Priority?

Served by eight routes and more than 40 buses (two-way) during the AM and PM peak hours, the Robie/Young Street Transit Priority Corridor project is a key component of the Integrated Mobility Plan (2017). The IMP recommended investment in transit lanes on several key corridors to give priority to buses over general traffic, improve transit reliability, and ultimately encourage more people to use transit. In July 2019, Regional Council approved the detailed design of the dedicated bus lanes on Robie Street (between Quinpool Road and Young Street) and Young Street (between Robie and Windsor streets). Read the full staff report on this project.

Phasing

In July 2019, Regional Council approved the detailed design of dedicated bus lanes on Robie Street (between Quinpool Road and Young Street) and Young Street (between Robie Street and Windsor Street). The project will be completed in two phases:

  • Phase 1, which added bus lanes to the majority of Robie Street (between Quinpool Road and Young Street) and Young Street (between Robie and Windsor streets), was completed in October 2020.
  • Phase 2, which will add bus lanes to the remaining sections including Robie Street (between Cunard Street and Almon Street) and Young Street (between Robie Street and Windsor Street) is being investigated and timelines are currently undetermined.
Graphic showing Phase 1 and Phase 2 implementation for Robie Street and Young Street Transit Priority.

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Questions?
Contact Mike Connors (Transportation Engineer, HRM Transportation Planning) .

Common Questions

Why are these bus lanes necessary?

Traffic congestion on Robie Street and Young Street has significant impacts on Halifax Transit and reduces the ability to provide a high quality, reliable service to residents. Adding bus lanes to this roadway corridor will help to improve transit service and play a key role in achieving the desired transportation vision included in the Integrated Mobility Program (IMP),the Moving Forward Together Plan (MFTP) and the Rapid Transit Strategy.

How will the bus lanes improve things?

Bus lanes will allow buses to move freely through congested traffic conditions during rush hour and other busy times of the day, improving transit travel time, reliability, and allowing more people to travel more conveniently and efficiently.

How will the bus lanes impact vehicle traffic?

Bus lanes will be added on Robie Street and Young Street by converting existing traffic lanes. The loss of traffic lanes on some segments of Robie Street and Young Street may increase traffic congestion during peak periods; however, significant increases in congestion are not anticipated. The removal of buses from general purpose traffic lanes will have a benefit to traffic flow.

How will the bus lanes impact pedestrians and cyclists?

The Robie Street – Cunard Street intersection will see significantly reduced pedestrian crossing distances and increased off-street green space on the Halifax Common by reducing the size of the intersection and modifying the alignment of Cunard Street. For the remainder of the Robie Street / Young Street corridor, pedestrians will be generally unaffected by the changes, as sidewalks will remain unchanged.

How do the time restrictions for the bus lanes work?

On Robie Street, the bus lanes will be in effect between 6 a.m. – 6 p.m., Monday to Friday. On Young Street, the bus lanes will be in effect at all times.  Time restrictions will be identified on roadside signage. During these periods, vehicles are not permitted to drive, park, or stop in the bus lanes. However, vehicles are permitted to merge into the bus lane to make a right turn at an intersection or driveway.

How will on-street parking be impacted by the bus lanes?

During periods when the bus lanes are in effect, on-street parking will be restricted throughout the Robie Street / Young Street corridor. On-street parking restrictions are required in order to allow buses unimpeded use of the lanes. Vehicles that park in the bus lane during these periods can expect to be ticketed and/or towed.

When the bus lane is not in effect, on-street parking will be permitted in some areas. Check parking regulation signage to determine areas where on-street parking is permitted, and parking time limits, where applicable.

Why are bus lanes only being added in one direction in some areas?

Some sections of the Robie Street / Young Street corridor are currently too narrow to add bus lanes in both directions, and widening of the roadway will be required. Planning and design for this work is currently underway; however, implementation timelines are not currently known.